Cybersecurity mesh architecture

A cybersecurity mesh architecture (CSMA) is a security operations approach for architecting composable, distributed security controls that improve cybersecurity effectiveness. CSMA provides a flexible security architecture where insights are shared, coordinated, and acted upon in a distributed way.

A CSMA approach can enable secure, centralized security operations and oversight that emphasizes composable, independent security monitoring, analytics and enforcement, centralized intelligence and governance, and a common identity fabric. CSMA addresses the growing complexity of managing single-function security tools, intelligence, and identity solutions.

CSMA addresses the following:

  • Centralizes policy management and threat databases
  • Coordinates detection methodology, threat correlation and response
  • Increases the efficiency of cross-tool collaboration

CSMA creates a collaborative ecosystem of security tools that is consistent and easily understandable and minimizes exposure that is consistent with business expectations. Understanding impact and likelihood of vulnerabilities creates an understanding of exposure. This is a critical requirement for making business-impacting security decisions.

Ridge Security CSMA support

Supporting CSMA, by implementing auto pentesting, red teaming and EASM security measures, organizations gain greater visibility and control to overcome breaches, minimize risks, and increase security resilience. As part of an integrated CSMA approach, Ridge Security’s RidgeBot®, an automated pentest robot for risk-based vulnerability and risk management, acts like human attackers using sophisticated exploits. RidgeBot relentlessly locates exploits across an enterprise network, documents its findings, continuously measures results and effectiveness, and verifies vulnerabilities.

RidgeBot enables organizations to conduct automated pentesting from an attacker’s point of view. Before exposures are put into production, RidgeBot finds, assesses, prioritizes, and fixes a wide set of exposures before bad actors get to them. The resulting validation allows organizations to see what would happen in the event of an attack, how their defenses would cope, and how well the processes would perform.